Historical Archive – Scandicci Cultura http://scandiccicultura.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:17:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://scandiccicultura.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Historical Archive – Scandicci Cultura http://scandiccicultura.org/ 32 32 LIU’s New Digital Archive Provides Insight into Long Island History https://scandiccicultura.org/lius-new-digital-archive-provides-insight-into-long-island-history/ https://scandiccicultura.org/lius-new-digital-archive-provides-insight-into-long-island-history/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:14:26 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/lius-new-digital-archive-provides-insight-into-long-island-history/ GLEN COVE, NY – A new digital treasure containing thousands of historical documents on Long Island is now available to the public. The archive, titled “Digitizing Local History Sources,” was released Thursday by the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University. It is home to more than 51,000 images from 40 […]]]>


GLEN COVE, NY – A new digital treasure containing thousands of historical documents on Long Island is now available to the public.

The archive, titled “Digitizing Local History Sources,” was released Thursday by the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University. It is home to more than 51,000 images from 40 participating historical societies across Long Island – and was funded by the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation (RDLGF).

“RDLGF’s partnership with the LIU Palmer School of Library and Information Science provides students with hands-on archival training while introducing our historic stewards to best practices in managing and accessing their incredible resources,” said Kathryn Mr. Curran, Executive Director of the Foundation. “The availability of these collections online will now easily expand research capabilities into Long Island’s rich heritage. “

The collection took four years to create and includes:

  • 1920s schoolgirl diary
  • The calendar of a school principal of the Second World War
  • 17th century acts
  • Photos of car races from the early 1900s
  • Albums documenting the destruction caused by the 1938 hurricane

All of these recordings – and more – can be accessed by visiting this link.



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Join us for an evening of celebration and appreciation https://scandiccicultura.org/join-us-for-an-evening-of-celebration-and-appreciation/ https://scandiccicultura.org/join-us-for-an-evening-of-celebration-and-appreciation/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 17:03:45 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/join-us-for-an-evening-of-celebration-and-appreciation/ We are delighted to share that the Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center (JHC) of the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) marks a decade of collaboration and achievement (2010-2020). We hope you can join us for a festive event on Thursday June 10, where we will also honor Margot Stern Strom with the Tzedakah Lifetime […]]]>


We are delighted to share that the Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center (JHC) of the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) marks a decade of collaboration and achievement (2010-2020). We hope you can join us for a festive event on Thursday June 10, where we will also honor Margot Stern Strom with the Tzedakah Lifetime Achievement Award. As the visionary founder of Facing History and Ourselves, Margot has inspired millions of young people to reflect on anti-Semitism, racism and prejudice and to become honest citizens.

In 2020, the JHC celebrated its 10th anniversary at the NEHGS. Over the past decade, we have grown from an independent Jewish archive of Boston and New England Jewish history to a comprehensive center of genealogical research, education and resources serving thousands of people each. year. Thanks to the vision of NEHGS management and Life Director Justin “Jerry” Wyner, what began as a strategic collaboration today is even greater than the sum of its parts.

  • At the virtual anniversary event, we’ll start the evening with a special cocktail party led by Dammara Kovnats Hall, professor of Jewish studies in Manhattan and founder of Jewish Cocktails, an event company specializing in kosher and Jewish themes. cocktails and classes. She will feature celebratory cocktails created especially for this event and attendees can join them at home. Originally from Winnipeg, Canada, Dammara worked as a mixologist while attending New York University. While living in Israel pursuing a Masters in Jewish Education, she came up with the idea of ​​synthesizing her love of Judaism and her passion for mixology.

    During the program, we will honor Margot and introduce her in conversation with her son Adam Strom, co-founder of Re-Imagining Migration. Additionally, Herbert Selesnick will receive the Volunteer Leadership Award for his invaluable work as an active member of the JHC Advisory Board, including, most recently, leading a strategic planning process for the JHC.

    History and collections of JHC

    In 2010, American Ancestors / NEHGS and the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS), of which Justin Wyner had served as a member and chairman of the board, created a collaboration to provide a permanent home for the precious New England archives ( NEA) of the AJHS. With growing interest in historical research on the Jewish family and increased use of archives, lifelong custody of the AJHS-NEA collection was granted to NEHGS, and the Jewish Heritage Center was officially established in November 2017. In 2018, the center was renamed the Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center to honor Justin and the late Genevieve Wyner for their leadership in establishing the initial collaboration, and for their long-standing advocacy and generosity towards this important historical Jewish resource.

    Today, the JHC engages historians, genealogists, partner organizations, students and the general public in the study of Jewish history, culture and heritage through its extensive archival collections, its educational programs and public events. In total, the JHC houses more than 2 million documents in its archives and has digitized nearly 700,000 documents as part of an ongoing project to make its collections accessible to the public online. It contains the unique historical records of Jewish families, institutions and communities in Boston, New England and beyond.

    10 years of achievements

    Over the past decade at NEHGS, the JHC has achieved several milestones, including:

    • Maintain and professionally transfer AJHS-NEA funds, comprising over 2 million documents, to a permanent home at 99-101 Newbury St., Boston
    • Acquisition of nearly 200 additional archival collections on the Jewish history of Boston and New England
    • Digitize nearly 700,000 archival documents and make them available online to researchers and others (e.g. correspondence from author Mary Antin [1881–1949] to educator, publisher and politician Alfred Seelye Roe [1844–1917])
    • Publication of two books with the imprint of the Jewish Heritage Center: The Family History of David Kruger, “Families of the Diaspora: Alkalay, Behmoiras, Merezón, Barcan” (by Newbury Street Press), and the memoirs of Justin Wyner , ” Did you speak ?
    • Establishment of a community advisory board
    • Launched a series of acclaimed educational events including webinars on Jewish history and culture “Shabbat Archives” community programs; co-sponsored talks with partner organizations; and professional presentations for researchers, genealogists, educators and students
    • Serve as a vital resource for researchers and institutions around the world, including Yad Vashem in Israel and the Smithsonian Institute

    We are proud of JHC’s work over the past decade and are grateful to CJP and the Jewish community as a whole for supporting and allowing JHC to flourish. As we look to the next 10 years and beyond, we look forward to building on the foundation we have created as the only center of its kind specializing in the Jewish history of Boston and New England and as as one of the country’s main resources for Jewish heritage. .

    The Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center (JHC) of the New England Historic Genealogical Society (American Ancestors / NEHGS) is a premier destination for exploring and preserving the history of Jewish families and institutions in New England and beyond. Rachel King is the Executive Director of JHC.

    This message was provided by a third party. Opinions, facts and any media content are presented solely by the author, and JewishBoston assumes no responsibility for them. Want to add your voice to the conversation? Publish your own post here.

    AFTER





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Looking Back – Ewing Restaurant https://scandiccicultura.org/looking-back-ewing-restaurant/ https://scandiccicultura.org/looking-back-ewing-restaurant/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 01:19:20 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/looking-back-ewing-restaurant/ This is a circa 1974 photo of the southwest corner of Monument Square showing Ewing’s restaurant and cafeteria. Submitted photo This is a circa 1974 photo of the southwest corner of Monument Square in Urbana showing Ewing’s restaurant and cafeteria. Ewing’s was not only well known in Champaign County, but throughout west-central Ohio. The Pooler […]]]>


This is a circa 1974 photo of the southwest corner of Monument Square showing Ewing’s restaurant and cafeteria.

Submitted photo

This is a circa 1974 photo of the southwest corner of Monument Square in Urbana showing Ewing’s restaurant and cafeteria.

Ewing’s was not only well known in Champaign County, but throughout west-central Ohio. The Pooler family operated the business which included a cafe and bakery. Often, on Sundays at noon, customers would line up at the entrance at the corner of Miami Street; once inside, they often found Carl Pooler himself cutting up a prime rib. At the end of the line, uniformed waitresses met customers at the cash register and carried each tray to a table.

Ewing’s served large family meals on special occasions, such as the Christmas holidays, on the second floor of this building.

In the mid-19th century, the third floor of this building served as a meeting space known as Union Hall. It was the site of theatrical performances as well as church bazaars and political speeches.

In 1863, the Ladies Aid Society of St. Paul’s African Methodist Episcopal Church in Urbana, on the occasion of the celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation, arranged for Frederick Douglass, the great abolitionist, to speak at Union Hall. However, it is unclear whether Douglass spoke there, as there is no documented account of having done so. In 1910 there was a cinema in this building, presumably on the third floor.

An interesting note regarding the building is that “Willcox & Gwynne” is engraved on a cast iron support column inside. It may have come from a local foundry, as members of the Gwynne family were Urbana’s first prominent merchants.

The Champaign County Historical Museum is a non-profit organization that depends on donations and membership fees to preserve, protect, archive, and display the artifacts that tell the story of Champaign County. The free public museum located at 809 E. Lawn Ave., Urbana, is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

This is a circa 1974 photo of the southwest corner of Monument Square showing Ewing’s restaurant and cafeteria.

Information from the Champaign County Historical Society.





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‘The good, the bad, everything’: US President Joe Biden pays tribute to survivors of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre in Oklahoma https://scandiccicultura.org/the-good-the-bad-everything-us-president-joe-biden-pays-tribute-to-survivors-of-the-1921-tulsa-race-massacre-in-oklahoma/ https://scandiccicultura.org/the-good-the-bad-everything-us-president-joe-biden-pays-tribute-to-survivors-of-the-1921-tulsa-race-massacre-in-oklahoma/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 01:08:27 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/the-good-the-bad-everything-us-president-joe-biden-pays-tribute-to-survivors-of-the-1921-tulsa-race-massacre-in-oklahoma/ Joe Biden became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the Tulsa, Oklahoma site where hundreds of black Americans were slaughtered by a white mob in 1921, saying the legacy of racist violence and white supremacy resonates always. “We should know the good, the bad, everything,” he said Tuesday in a speech to the few […]]]>


Joe Biden became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the Tulsa, Oklahoma site where hundreds of black Americans were slaughtered by a white mob in 1921, saying the legacy of racist violence and white supremacy resonates always.

“We should know the good, the bad, everything,” he said Tuesday in a speech to the few survivors of the Greenwood District attack in Tulsa and their descendants.

“That’s what great nations do.

“They come to terms with their dark sides.

“And we are a great nation.”

For too long, the story of the Tulsa massacre “has been told in silence,” President Joe Biden said. Credit: PA

Biden said the deadly Jan.6 attack on the United States Capitol and efforts by a number of states to restrict the vote echoed the same issue.

“What happened in Greenwood was an act of hatred and domestic terrorism, with a course of action that exists today,” Biden said.

Part of Greenwood District burnt down in race riots, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Part of Greenwood District burnt down in race riots, Tulsa, Oklahoma Credit: Universal History Archives/Universal History Archives
An African-American man with a camera looks at the iron bed skeletons rising above the ashes of a burnt block after the Tulsa Race Massacre.
An African American man with a camera looks at the iron bed skeletons rising above the ashes of a burnt block after the Tulsa Race Massacre. Credit: Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images

White residents of Tulsa shot dead as many as 300 blacks on May 31 and June 1, 1921, and torched and looted homes and businesses, devastating a thriving African-American community after a white woman accused a black man of assault, an allegation that has never been proven.

No one has been charged for the violence.

Crowds watch the fires during the Tulsa Race Massacre.
Crowds watch the fires during the Tulsa Race Massacre in Oklahoma on June 1, 1921. Credit: PA
A group of National Guard troops, carrying rifles with bayonets attached, escort unarmed African-American men to Convention Hall detention center after the Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 1921 .
A group of National Guard troops, carrying rifles with bayonets attached, escort unarmed African-American men to Convention Hall detention center after the Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 1921 . Credit: Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images
The aftermath, at the east corner of Greenwood Avenue and East Archer Street, of the Tulsa Race Massacre.
The aftermath, at the east corner of Greenwood Avenue and East Archer Street, of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Credit: Bettmann/Bettmann Archives

Biden said one of the attack survivors remembered it on Jan.6 when far-right supporters of then-President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol as Congress certified Biden’s victory in the 2020 election.

The White House has announced a series of policy initiatives to tackle racial inequalities, including plans to invest tens of billions of dollars in communities that suffer from persistent poverty and efforts to tackle gender discrimination. housing.

Families of affected Oklahoma residents have asked for financial reparations, a move Biden only vowed to investigate further.

Biden said his administration would soon also unveil measures to tackle hate crimes and white supremacist violence which he said the intelligence community had concluded as “the deadliest threat to the homeland.”

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks at a rally during commemorations for the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre June 1, 2021 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks at a rally during commemorations for the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre June 1, 2021 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Credit: Brandon bell/Getty Images

He also entrusted Vice President Kamala Harris, the first black American and the first Asian American to hold the post, to lead his administration’s efforts to counter Republican efforts to curtail voting rights.

Several Republican-led states, arguing the need for stronger election security, have passed or proposed voting restrictions, which Biden and other Democrats say are aimed at making it harder for black voters to vote.

Biden oversaw a minute’s silence for the victims of Tulsa after meeting three people who lived in Greenwood during the massacre, Viola Fletcher, Hughes Van Ellis and Lessie Benningfield Randle.

Now aged 101 to 107, the survivors have sought “justice” in Congress this year and are party to legal action against state and local officials.

Joe biden
US President Joe Biden visited the Greenwood Cultural Center to mark the Tulsa Race Massacre. Credit: PA

The visit came amid a racial calculation in the United States as the country’s white majority shrinks, threats rise from white supremacist groups, and the country reconsiders its treatment of African Americans after the murder of George Floyd , a black man, by a white last year. Minneapolis police officer, sparked nationwide protests.

Biden, who won the goodwill of black voters as Barack Obama’s vice president, has made tackling racial inequality a key platform for his 2020 campaign.

He met members of Floyd’s family last week on the anniversary of his death and is pushing for passage of a police reform bill that bears Floyd’s name.

His trip on Tuesday was in stark contrast to that of a year ago, when Trump, a Republican who criticized Black Lives Matter and other racial justice movements, called for a political rally in Tulsa on June 19, “June”. »Anniversary celebrating the end of the United States. slavery in 1865. The rally was postponed after criticism.



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Who owns the National Archives of India? https://scandiccicultura.org/who-owns-the-national-archives-of-india/ https://scandiccicultura.org/who-owns-the-national-archives-of-india/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 03:30:00 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/who-owns-the-national-archives-of-india/ The Narendra Modi government’s Central Vista project in New Delhi aims to demolish the National Museum of India, the Indira Gandhi National Arts Center and the Annex of the National Archives of India. The National Archives Museum, which is located in the National Archives building, is also undergoing renovation. The immediate future of the content […]]]>


The Narendra Modi government’s Central Vista project in New Delhi aims to demolish the National Museum of India, the Indira Gandhi National Arts Center and the Annex of the National Archives of India. The National Archives Museum, which is located in the National Archives building, is also undergoing renovation. The immediate future of the content of these institutions is not clear.

Particularly with regard to the texts of the National Archives, there has been little disclosure of the file transfer processes, any imminent division of registers and any consequent changes in cataloging. Will files relating to specific ministries be redirected to their respective historical divisions? What will be done to ensure the security and integrity of funds which have not yet been declassified and which have therefore never been consulted by a general readership? Who will assess the condition of the temporary and permanent collections and what compliance will be imposed on them? What do these radical changes mean for historians and other users of the archives?

There are no clear answers to any of these questions, in blatant disregard for the mission statement of the National Archives of India which says that the organization seeks to “encourage scientific management, administration and retention of documents throughout the country ”.

The National Archives of India campus in New Delhi. Photo: Wikipedia

A fundamental philosophical invocation that every nation state must face at a contentious moment in its history is: Who owns the archives? Or, to be more provocative, if the state manages the archives, does it also own them?

An archivist will draw attention to the primary values ​​of an archive, among them both administrative and historical, to better illuminate this context. Taken together, these values ​​imply that, in fact, archives could be, and often are, a site of accountability. Through scholarly practice, in the social sciences, the humanities and beyond, an archive is where historical writing and revisionism become possible. As more and more new documents emerge and archival documents are accessed and read, a nation’s collective memory evolves.

The historical debates are largely devoted and revolve around the discovery of the mechanisms of state power inscribed in its textual forms, embodied in the archives and ideally protected for posterity. Indeed, access to the archives is politically free. As such, a national archive can be seen as an expression of the social contract, and beyond, as archives often attract a global audience.

An archivist will also highlight the secondary values ​​of an archive, the most relevant of which for India today is the intrinsic value of the documents. After all, archives and what they contain, and what they redact or erase, speak to the very heart of visibility and presence in a power-laden political regime, and its historical chronicle. In the absence of textual evidence, manipulation of national memory becomes a real possibility, without any basis for verification.

The global argument in favor of the neutrality of the archive has acquired a sophistication, considering the conservation of the material as neutral and moderate, speaking both of the positionality of the archivist, who builds the archive but also of the consumer, who translates or writes the archival material. It is a question of expertise and reflexivity, where the curator is aware, because he has acquired the professional expertise of, of himself in relation to the archive. Blithely eliminating these critical notions has its own ideological implications.

As far as India is concerned, there is such angst within the academic community in light of these new changes because engagement with the archives, even in their current pre-renovated state, is often hampered by 35-year declassification criteria, and slow adoption of rules. Most of the widely used material today did not become accessible to researchers until the early 2000s, which also involves jumping through hoops. Now it can cease to exist, or at the very least, become untraceable.

What historians specifically feel is not only a shock, but also a feeling of mourning as the discipline depends so much on these materials and their access. This indiscriminate treatment of these holdings can prove catastrophic for research on the articulated India of the Global South. Charged by the institutional inequalities that already plague the ramparts within which the humanities and social sciences function as disciplines outside the West and coupled with the demands of constantly having to make room for speech and activism living in these spaces will lead to further and widespread attrition and financial and social distress. Can we afford it as a nation?

An Indian political thinker would say that to know the future, ask a historian. To find out who said this, you need to enter an archive.

Swapna Kona Nayudu works on international relations and Indian political thought at Harvard University Asia Center, and tweets @konanayudu.



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OUT AND NOW: Holgate House paints a beautiful picture of Allandale’s legacy https://scandiccicultura.org/out-and-now-holgate-house-paints-a-beautiful-picture-of-allandales-legacy/ https://scandiccicultura.org/out-and-now-holgate-house-paints-a-beautiful-picture-of-allandales-legacy/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/out-and-now-holgate-house-paints-a-beautiful-picture-of-allandales-legacy/ Allandale-born artist Edwin Holgate was invited to join the Group of Seven in 1929 and showed with the famous group in 1930-31 This ongoing series from Barrie Historical Archives Curator Deb Exel shows old photos from the collection and one from today, along with the history behind them. Holgate House Edwin Holgate, eighth member of […]]]>


Allandale-born artist Edwin Holgate was invited to join the Group of Seven in 1929 and showed with the famous group in 1930-31

This ongoing series from Barrie Historical Archives Curator Deb Exel shows old photos from the collection and one from today, along with the history behind them.

Holgate House

Edwin Holgate, eighth member of the prestigious Group of Seven Artists, was born in Allandale in 1892.

Holgate studied art in Europe before enlisting in 1916 to serve in the Canadian Army in France during World War I.

After the war, Holgate continued in Montreal as a painter, muralist and woodcarver, student and teacher.

In 1929 he was invited to join the Group of Seven and showed with the group in 1930-1931.

During World War II, Holgate worked as an official Canadian war artist with the Royal Canadian Air Force in England.

Holgate was also one of 18 Canadian artists who in 1954 were commissioned for a project by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR).

The Canadian transcontinental train was putting new park cars into service and wanted a mural depicting a national or provincial park inside the ear car. Holgate’s mission was Mont-Tremblant National Park in Quebec.

But do you think Holgate Street was named after our famous local artist?

Nope. It was named for Edwin’s father – Henry Holgate.

The elder Holgate was a civil engineer, apprenticed to the Northern Railway for Frederic Cumberland in 1878, employed in railway construction and maintenance until 1891, then in the design of bridges and structures until 1894 It was in 1891 that Sir Henry Tyler, president of the Grand Trunk Railway, came to Barrie and Allandale to inspect the Northern Division.

Holgate, along with other suits and employees, accompanied Sir Henry on his inspection – the train consisted of a “well-equipped locomotive” and four wagons. VIPs were said to have been delighted with the situation in Barrie, with the general manager noting that when he looked out over the bay “they had entered the Garden of Eden”.

The whole group agreed that Allandale and Barrie were the neatest and cleanest stations seen on the Grand Trunk system to date. The group did not need hotel accommodation for their overnight stay – their train had all the necessary facilities.

Before leaving for Collingwood, Meaford, Penetanguishene and then North Bay, Sir Henry used the platform at Carley Baths (and the waters of Kempenfelt Bay) for bathing. Overall, the executives were extremely satisfied with the conditions and the good work being done at “Barrie la belle” and “Allandale l’occupé”.

It was also in 1891, at a meeting on November 12 at Bothwell’s Hall, that Henry Holgate introduced the motion which was passed and carried by a large majority: “ Resolved, that it is desirable on the part of the taxpayers of the Village of Allandale to appoint a committee to consult with the Town of Barrie to determine the terms under which the Town of Barrie proposes to unite with the Village of Allandale: and to report to a meeting of Allandale taxpayers, which will take place on Saturday evening, 21st inst, at 8 a.m.

The rest, as they say, is history.

Henry Holgate joined the Royal Electric Company in 1894, moving the family first to Montreal (and building the Montreal Park and Island Railway), then to Jamaica in 1898 with the West India Electric Company, building the electric streetcar in Kingston.

Returning to Montreal in 1901, Holgate was an integral part of several key projects and initiatives, including the appointment as chairman of the Royal Commission into the terrible collapse of the Quebec Bridge in 1907.

The Holgates Henry, Bessie and the children never lived on Holgate Street, which was previously called Fleming Street after another civil engineer, Sir Sanford Fleming. In 1888, Holgate had bought property in Allandale from lumberjack and soon-to-be neighbor James Burton, building the fascinating family home at 90 William Street, where their talented son Edwin would be born.

The garden side or formal front of the house faces the lake, but the William Street side is also considered a “second” front of the house. Both are equally charming views from this beautiful, historically significant home.



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Illuminated Fort Recovery Monument | The daily standard stories https://scandiccicultura.org/illuminated-fort-recovery-monument-the-daily-standard-stories/ https://scandiccicultura.org/illuminated-fort-recovery-monument-the-daily-standard-stories/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 18:02:08 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/illuminated-fort-recovery-monument-the-daily-standard-stories/ Saturday May 29, 2021 By William Kincaid The monument at Fort Recovery Monument Park was first lit Friday ni. . . FORT RECOVERY – With the push of a button, Lester Huelskamp, ​​the oldest living veteran among the village’s veteran organizations, illuminated the Fort Recovery monument in brilliant light on Friday night. The Fort Recovery […]]]>


Saturday May 29, 2021

By William Kincaid

The monument at Fort Recovery Monument Park was first lit Friday ni. . .

FORT RECOVERY – With the push of a button, Lester Huelskamp, ​​the oldest living veteran among the village’s veteran organizations, illuminated the Fort Recovery monument in brilliant light on Friday night.

The Fort Recovery Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6515 and American Legion Post 345 have partnered with the Fort Recovery Historical Society and the Fort Recovery State Memorial to host a unique joint Memorial Day celebration and ceremonial lighting of the monument.

Due to the rain, traditional ceremonies hosted by members of the American Legion and VFW have been moved inside Fort Recovery High School.

Afterwards, the veterans groups drove crowds of people across the street to Monument Park. Approximately 1,000 white crosses depicting soldiers killed in the battles of 1791 and 1794 which paved the way for the westward expansion of a nascent country, surrounded the 101-foot-high obelisk at Monument Park, inspiring moments of thought and appreciation for all veterans who served their country in times of need.

Huelskamp, ​​98, inaugurated the first lighting of the monument, an event that has been brewing for 10 years. A series of lamps surrounding the monument illuminated the impressive structure. After the switch was activated, the Fort Recovery High School group, under the direction of Reid Knuth, launched the national anthem and Reverend Ned Brown offered the blessing. This was followed by a 21-shot salute and tap play.

The patrons of the museum had undertaken to install lighting to illuminate the monument, the cornerstone of the historic heritage of the village. A fundraising campaign was launched thanks to a generous donation from the John and Mary Ann Wendel family. Museum patrons, various organizations and others also contributed to the project, according to museum director Nancy Knapke.

Garmann / Miller made engineering, electrical and equipment plans for the lighting project that were approved by the monument’s owner Ohio History Connection, Knapke told the newspaper.

“Garmann / Miller agreed to do it without charging us for it, and we were really proud that Ryan Heitkamp and Chad Schroer, both local boys who work for this company, were able to do the majority of the work for us. , ” she said.

The towering monument pays homage to the men, women and children who died in the Battle of Wabash, also known as St. Clair’s Defeat in 1791, and the Battle of Fort Recovery in 1794.

Composed of gray North Carolina granite, the monument was authorized by President William Howard Taft and built by the Van Amringe Granite Company of Boston, Massachusetts, in late 1912 before being officially opened in 1913. It was modeled on the Washington Monument. US General Arthur St. Clair’s historic campaign in 1791 in northwest Ohio to gain control of the area between the Ohio River and the Great Lakes was unsuccessful and one of the nation’s worst military fiascoes. .

The tide turned for the Americans in 1794 with the Battle of Fort Recovery, when the US military defeated the largest Native American force ever assembled. As well as being one of the few times Native Americans attacked a fort, the battle led to the Treaty of Greenville in 1795.



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Once overlooked in classrooms, the Tulsa racial massacre is now seen as an ‘important’ lesson in Oklahoma schools https://scandiccicultura.org/once-overlooked-in-classrooms-the-tulsa-racial-massacre-is-now-seen-as-an-important-lesson-in-oklahoma-schools/ https://scandiccicultura.org/once-overlooked-in-classrooms-the-tulsa-racial-massacre-is-now-seen-as-an-important-lesson-in-oklahoma-schools/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 18:30:00 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/once-overlooked-in-classrooms-the-tulsa-racial-massacre-is-now-seen-as-an-important-lesson-in-oklahoma-schools/ Katrina Eaton could hear the emotion in her 12-year-old son Isaac’s voice when he came home and spoke about what he had learned in school. His teachers at Carver Middle School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, had taught that day about a racial massacre in the city a century ago, when a white mob descended on Tulsa’s […]]]>


Katrina Eaton could hear the emotion in her 12-year-old son Isaac’s voice when he came home and spoke about what he had learned in school.

His teachers at Carver Middle School in Tulsa, Oklahoma, had taught that day about a racial massacre in the city a century ago, when a white mob descended on Tulsa’s Black Greenwood neighborhood, killing hundreds, destroying many successful businesses and leaving thousands homeless. .

Education was also a lesson for Eaton.

“I mean, I learned more from what his school taught him,” said Eaton, who is white. “We all need to talk about the facts and what happened in the past.”

As the country prepares next week to mark the 100th anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre – considered one of the worst incidents of racial violence in the country’s history – Oklahoma schools strive to ensure that residents grow up aware of the tragedy. The effort is an about-face after what many say are years of silence or insufficient education on the subject.

“We have to teach this and face the ugliness of what I think we’ve been too ashamed to talk about in the past,” said Joy Hofmeister, superintendent of the state’s education department. “We cannot turn our backs on the truth.”

Hofmeister said she grew up in Tulsa and only learned of the massacre as an adult.

The state has included the racial massacre in Tulsa in its academic standards since 2002, but the standards did not specify what teachers should teach and how they should teach it, spending little or no time at all. , on this subject.

A view of Greenwood Avenue looking north in 1938.Greenwood Cultural Center / Getty Images

That changed in 2019, when the state’s education ministry incorporated what and how into the requirements of state academic standards at different levels, Hofmeister said.

Since then, the Department of Education has also provided additional resources to help teachers deliver lessons.

Sam Dester taught 11th grade students in US history and an advanced placement in US history at Charles Page High School in Sand Springs this year.

He said he required students to view first-hand testimonies and photographs, such as articles from the American Red Cross and other organizations in the field. Then he asked them to share their thoughts, feelings and general reactions.

“When you see these photographs of what Europe looks like after WWII, I mean, in fact, these buildings that are just seashells,” he said. “Then they start to wonder how you can just jump on the freeway and you could be there in five minutes – it’s kind of like a shock wave.”

It supports the teaching of the massacre in schools and encourages teachers to teach it by including it in the academic standards of the state.

“I mean, the last time you take World History might be in 10th grade. For the rest of your life,” he says. “And so every time that story is reinforced for you, it really matters.”

Melani Ford didn’t hesitate to teach her preschoolers Greenwood this year at Cleveland Bailey Elementary School in Midwest City. She said she told them that a long time ago in Tulsa there was a town and some people set it on fire.

“I’m saying it happened here in Oklahoma and we haven’t recovered from it, but we’re trying to do better about it,” said Ford, 33, who is black.

Other teachers may be reluctant to introduce the neighborhood or the historic event to young children because it is “such a heavy topic” and they don’t know how to talk about those killed, Ford said.

But she said that for younger students, adults can start by presenting larger ideas of what happened and saying, “We’re not happy about that.”

“The story is not always good, but we have to know what happened and why it happened and know that we can do better,” she said. “To understand that, yeah, there was a group of people who did that, and we have to make sure we don’t repeat ourselves, I think it’s important to learn, no matter what age.”

But there are fears that some of the progress made in teaching a fuller version of state history may be erased.

Damaged properties burned down during the Tulsa massacre in June 1921.Oklahoma Historical Society / Getty Images

Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt this month signed a law prohibiting the teaching of concepts or courses that may “cause discomfort, guilt, anguish or any other form of psychological distress” because their race or gender. It also prohibits the promotion of concepts such as anyone, “because of their race or gender, is inherently racist, sexist or oppressive, consciously or unconsciously”.

“Today more than ever, we need policies that bring us together, not that tear us apart,” Stitt said in a statement on Twitter. “As governor, I firmly believe that not a cent of taxpayer dollars should be used to define and divide young Oklahomans on their race or gender. This is what this bill supports for. public education. “

The law comes into force on July 1.

Teaching about the Tulsa and Greenwood District Racial Massacre continues to be a state academic standard in state and US history. Critics of the law worry about the “chilling effect” it might have on educators trying to teach complex historical topics involving race or gender.

“It’s safe to twist the knife into the wound, so to speak,” Eaton said of the moment of the law.

State Representative Monroe Nichols, who represents the District of Greenwood, said the law “puts enormous pressure on educators to do the right thing, but it’s unclear what that means.”

“I think the law was drafted in such a way that there is so much ambiguity,” said Nichols, who is black. Nichols resigned from the Tulsa Race Massacre Commission in 1921 this month due to the new law.

Speaking about his 13 year old son, who learned about the massacre in school, he said: “I think it is very important to understand these things not only to be educated about it, but to understand what it is. means, as far as we have to move forward. “

Naomi Andrews, mother of four in grades six to nine, said, “They are creating a world that is not based on reality. They are hiding information from the students and teachers who would teach it.”

Susan Foust, a recently retired librarian who helped teachers develop the fifth grade curriculum to teach racial massacre at Emerson Elementary School in Tulsa, agreed.

“It has to be said. And the teachers have to be the ones who teach it,” she said. “To tell us that we can’t talk about racism and that we have to make sure that no one feels guilty – I mean, you have to understand what human nature is and how communities have to support each other. “

CORRECTION (May 27, 2021, 11:20 p.m. ET): A news alert that was issued for this article misrepresented a new state law in Oklahoma. This would prohibit the teaching of material that would make students feel uncomfortable because of their race; that would not make the teaching of the Tulsa massacre permanent.



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Augusta Historical Society to open to walk-in research https://scandiccicultura.org/augusta-historical-society-to-open-to-walk-in-research/ https://scandiccicultura.org/augusta-historical-society-to-open-to-walk-in-research/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 04:00:40 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/augusta-historical-society-to-open-to-walk-in-research/ Headquarters of the Kennebec Historical Society, Henry Weld Fuller Jr. House in Augusta. Photo by Scott R. Wood AUGUSTA – As Maine begins to rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Société historique de Kennebec plans to open to walk-in research starting Tuesday, June 1. According to the latest state guidelines, researchers are advised to wear […]]]>


Headquarters of the Kennebec Historical Society, Henry Weld Fuller Jr. House in Augusta. Photo by Scott R. Wood

AUGUSTA – As Maine begins to rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Société historique de Kennebec plans to open to walk-in research starting Tuesday, June 1.

According to the latest state guidelines, researchers are advised to wear a mask, but it is no longer necessary. The company also encourages anyone to stay home if they are sick or have symptoms of COVID-19 such as fever, sore throat, chills, cough, shortness of breath, congestion, nausea or vomiting.

The Henry Weld Fuller Jr. House, which was previously only open by appointment, will allow visitors to research its Kennebec County collections and receive a brief tour of the building. The Fuller House at 107 Winthrop St. serves as the company’s headquarters, and its temperature-controlled records are recognized by the state as an alternative repository for government records.

The company collects documents, photographs, manuscripts, books, ephemera, maps and albums related to all of Kennebec County’s communities and their history. Over the years, the company has accumulated these unique personal holdings which cannot be found anywhere else.

Visitors primarily include residents and former residents of the 30 municipalities in Kennebec County who are interested in local or Maine history, people researching the history of their home or family, and students who researching high school or college assignments. Additionally, the company responds to numerous email inquiries from across the United States for genealogical and historical information.

Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. Researchers are still able to make appointments if they cannot come during normal operating hours.

For more information, call Scott Wood, General Manager, at 207-622-7718 or email him at [email protected].

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Scuttlebutt / Calendar – May 27, 2021 – The Sopris Sun https://scandiccicultura.org/scuttlebutt-calendar-may-27-2021-the-sopris-sun/ https://scandiccicultura.org/scuttlebutt-calendar-may-27-2021-the-sopris-sun/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 21:54:38 +0000 https://scandiccicultura.org/scuttlebutt-calendar-may-27-2021-the-sopris-sun/ Radio news Aspen Public Radio has hired Breeze Richardson as the station’s next executive director. Richardson recently worked as Director of Marketing and Communications at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri. Meanwhile, Colorado Public Radio’s Indie 102.3 will now broadcast on Carbondale on 96.7 FM as KNDH. For more information, visit […]]]>


Radio news

Aspen Public Radio has hired Breeze Richardson as the station’s next executive director. Richardson recently worked as Director of Marketing and Communications at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri. Meanwhile, Colorado Public Radio’s Indie 102.3 will now broadcast on Carbondale on 96.7 FM as KNDH. For more information, visit indie1023.org

Bustang

Capacity restrictions have been lifted for travelers from Bustang. In addition, more buses have been added between Grand Junction and Denver on weekdays and weekends. Since May 26, face masks are mandatory for passengers. For full itinerary details visit ridebustang.com

Woody and Dumpling

The Thunder River Theater Company and the Stage of Life Theater Company present “Woody and Dumpling and the Journey Back to Normal,” an animated musical starring children’s entertainers Luke Ryan and Maura Fawley. The production is available in streaming for free on thunderrivertheatre.com

Audible story

Carbondale Historical Society members Kim McGee and John Williams created an audio tour of historic homes using material compiled for the Carbondale Historical Preservation Committee. Meanwhile, the “This I Remember” audio archive is growing with over 70 episodes featuring local voices from Carbondale’s past. Find them and more at carbondalehistory.org

Summer reading challenge

The Summer Reading Challenge begins June 1. Readers of all ages are invited to help reach the community’s goal of 750,000 total minutes of reading. You can track your time using Beanstack, an app for your phone, or by signing up at your local library for a journal reading. Read 1,000 minutes or more to enter a grand prize draw.

Outdoor Paint Out

The Redstone Art Foundation is hosting its first annual Plein Air Paint Out this Memorial Day weekend. Nine local artists will capture the beauty of Redstone with their paintings on sale May 29 in shops in downtown Redstone. Special guests include performance painter Marcel Kahhak and Barbara Churchley, plus a quick draw competition and more. For schedule and registration, visit redstoneartfoundation.org

For the love of pika

The Front Range Pika Project offers trail runners and hikers the opportunity to do citizen science this summer at sites in the White River National Forest including Ashcroft, Maroon Bells, Independence Pass and Mount Sopris. Opportunities for participation range from depositing temperature loggers to comprehensive training on pika site monitoring. More on pikapartners.org

Basalt half marathon

The 44th Annual Basalt Half Marathon will take place on Sunday June 6. The race is open to individual runners and two-person relay teams and begins at Frying Pan Road and ends at Lion’s Park. All proceeds go to the Basalt High School Cross Country Team. More info and registration and basalthalfmarathon.com

Summer advantage

Registration for the free Summit54 Summer Advantage program is open to elementary students served by the Roaring Fork Schools District. The program will be offered at Basalt, Carbondale and Glenwood Spring from June 21 to July 23, Monday to Friday, 8 am to 2:30 pm Daily bus transportation and meals are included as well as on-the-go after-party snacks. school courtesy of Food Bank of the Rockies. Math and reading skills are taught with art, music, and more. Registration is via summeradvantage.org or 1-866-924-7226.

Welcome Rangel

Courtney Rangel, Bilingualism Coordinator for Roaring Fork School, has been chosen to become Riverview School’s next vice-principal. In a letter to the school community, River View Principal Adam Volek said, “Courtney strongly believes that all students deserve the best educational experience and that student and family relationships, as well as responsive practices in matters of equity and social justice, are the cornerstones of our work to create a safe and inclusive environment for all children. ” Congratulations!

Pump Track trials for children

On Wednesday, May 19, the Carbondale Parks and Recreation Department hosted children’s pumping track trials at Carbondale Bike Park, a free competition as part of Bonedale Bike Week. There were 35 participants in three different divisions.

They say it’s your birthday

People celebrating another trip around the sun this week include: Savanna Bristol, Lacy Dunlavy, Richard Glasier and Jennifer Johnson (May 27); Dorie Hunt, Joan Lamont, Louis Meyer, Alex Salvidrez and Amanda Seubert (May 28); Clark Cretti (May 29); Rianna Briggs, Barbara Frota and Jay Harrington (May 30); Chip Munday, Shea Nieslanik, Debbie Romanus and Carolyn Sackariason (June 1); Li McBrayer, Easton O’Flannery and Tracy Trulove (June 2); Trary Maddalone LaMee and Anna Ramirez (June 3).

~ Community calendar ~

THURSDAY MAY 27

YOGA PARK

Kula teaches flow yoga at Sopris Park, with beats by DJ Bhakti Styler, at 6 pm. Details on kulayogaonmain.com/special-events

BACH, BALLADES, BALLET

Carbondale Arts’ garden music series at historic Thompson House kicks off with MinTze Wu, Natalie Spears and Alexandra Jerkunica performing at 6 p.m. Tickets on carbondalearts.com

LIVE MUSIC

Feeding Giants performs at Heather’s in Basalt at 6 p.m.

FRIDAY MAY 28

OPENING ART

The Art Base in Basalt opens in its new location with a new exhibit, “A Light Within” by Heather Cherry, and an artist reception at 5 pm.

LIVE MUSIC

The Queen Bees, a new local girl-only group, performs at Heather’s in Basalt at 6 p.m.

SATURDAY MAY 29

BIRD LIBRARY

Mary Harris, of Roaring Fork Audubon, guides a walk at the Regional Basalt Library at 9 a.m. Register at basaltlibrary.org

SALE OF PLANTS

Wild Mountain Seeds sells plants, seeds and soil to True Nature from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC

Rodrigo Arreguín performs at Heather’s in Basalt at 6 p.m.

SUNDAY MAY 30

BIRD

Roaring Fork Audubon Society guides a walk in marble. Carpool departs from Carbondale at 6.30am. To register, send an email to fulcon@comcast.net

LIVE MUSIC

Chris Bank plays at Heather’s in Basalt from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Then LP Herd takes the stage from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

TUESDAY JUNE 1

FIELD STUDIES

Registration opens for the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies summer community programs. See the full list of programs on aspennature.org

GROUP HIKING

Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers Leads Grizzly Creek Burnt Area Tour at 9 a.m. Register on rfov.org

BIKE SALE

The Aspen Police Department is auctioning abandoned bikes outside the station at 540 E. Main Street. A preview of the articles starts at 10 a.m. Auctions begin at 11 a.m.

DRAWING CLUB

After a long hiatus, the Roaring Fork Drawing Club returns, meeting at Erin’s Acres at 6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 2

BIRD

Roaring Fork Audubon Society guides a trip near Woody Creek at 7 a.m. To register, contact chris.daniels@gmail.com

READING CLUB

The Basalte regional library hosts a virtual reading club on the first Wednesday of each month at noon. Register on basaltlibrary.org

WASHED

The Aspen Chapel Gallery presents a new ceramic and mixed media exhibition with an opening reception from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. A portion of all sales will benefit the Friends of Aspen Animal Shelter.

ASK A LAWYER

Alpine Legal Services offers a clinical hotline on Wednesdays from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Call 970-368-2246 and visit alpinelegalservices.org for the calendar of dates by legal subject.

COMMUNITY EXHIBITION

ValleyOrtho Orthopedic Surgeon Chris George presents “Treating Joint Pain with Cartilage Preservation and Restoration Procedures,” a virtual discussion at 6:00 pm. Registration on vvh.org/vvu

THURSDAY JUNE 3

CREATIVE CLUB

The Basalt Regional Library hosts the Teen Creative Club outside the library from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. for grades 5 to 12. More information on basaltlibrary.org

UNDER THE SUN

Join Sopris Sun correspondents and guests for Everything Under The Sun, which airs Thursdays on KDNK at 4 p.m.

BMX RACES

Weekly Thursday races are held at Crown Mountain Park starting at 6 p.m.

GROUP RACE

Independence Run and Hike has a weekly group run on Thursdays leaving the store at 6 p.m.

THURSDAY KARAOKE

The Black Nugget offers karaoke Thursdays at 7 p.m.

FRIDAY JUNE 4

IDENTIDAD Y LIBERTAD

Launchpad hosts opening reception for new outdoor show at 5:15 p.m.

SATURDAY JUNE 5

DANZA CLASSES

Dance Initiative and Carbondale Branch Library offer dance classes in Spanish every Saturday June at 10 a.m. More info at gcpld.org/summer-reading



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